Trivia for National Dollar Day

August 8, 1786.

That’s the day U.S. Congress (then the Continental Congress) established our monetary system. So today is deemed National Dollar Day, even though the first U.S. dollar bill wasn’t actually printed until 1862.

The original dollar bill didn’t showcase George Washington, however, but used the portrait of Salmon P. Chase, Treasury Secretary under President Lincoln. When George Washington first appeared, it was on the $1 Series 1869 note. (And actually, Martha Washington, George’s wife, was printed on the 1886 dollar bill.)

Today, our familiar $1 Federal Reserve Note (as it’s now called) still showcases President Washington and comprises about 45% of U.S. currency produced by the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing, much of which replaces worn out currency. FYI…The average lifespan of  a $1 dollar note is about 5.8 years.

Got a dollar? Track where it’s goes at www.Wheresgeorge.com.

 

 

 

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3 Responses to “Trivia for National Dollar Day”

  1. Retiring On My Terms

    Those are some interesting nuggets – thanks for sharing!

    I must admit that any time I receive a wheresgeorge dollar, I go online to track where it has been and update where it is now. I feel like I am probably breaking some obscure law by doing so, but its very interesting to see where those dollars have traveled.

    I haven’t had a wheresgeorge dollar in a couple years. I hope that means I am doing a better job saving my money and not spending unnecessarily. As entertaining as wheresgeorge is, I am hoping that financial independence will be even more fun!

    Reply

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